Just to add 5 cents, I entirely agree with Eric and William.  (and apologise for being a top-posting full-quoting bozo, but that's the way the thread's gone.)

Committing to a poorly-maintained distribution that no-one here has any experience with has left you in the situation of going around in circles with no-one being able to help.

"Minimal" and "fits in RAM" (ie, runs off a stick) aren't security metrics.  "Is well supported", "is frequently updated", and "is backed by experienced security professionals" are.

Puppy's had two releases since 2010.  That's not a secure distribution.  A quick review of its site shows a distro that's driven by a group of tinkerers rather than by an expert community.

There's folk on this list with direct security experience: many run Debian, and some of us even settle for Ubuntu.  Those are decisions based on professional experience, and it's hard to understand why you're reluctant to listen to that experience.


butting

On 05/07/16 22:15, Eric Light wrote:
Michelle I think you're going down the path of overcomplicating things again. 

William is right: You're not going to get the security you want by choosing an under-resourced distro like Puppy.  Any of the distros that William listed, even CentOS if you're that way inclined, are very actively maintained and have a raft of interested parties reviewing their security stance. Yes Puppy is great for having a small footprint, but why wouldn't you use an actual production-ready option? 

I recall you're very security conscious, and again it comes down to the question of your threat profile. I can't remember what you said last time, but previously I thought you were just trying to defend against viruses and other forms of corruption? 

My advice is to install a mainstream distro, and do a bit of reading on hardening that distro. That way you can go as far into the security rabbit hole as you desire, it's virtually guaranteed to work on your hardware, and it has the added benefit that your friendly wlug can offer advice.  :-)

E

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5. Jul 2016 21:21 by michelle400@orcon.net.nz:

I'm not looking to run puppy as the program that I'd surf the net on, but thanks. Puppy fits onto ram so I'd use it for banking and probably emails and use something else to surf the net with.



On 2016-07-05 20:46, William Mckee wrote:
On Tuesday, July 5, 2016, Michelle <michelle400@orcon.net.nz> wrote:
Hi William,

Puppy was the first distro I used and it's great for safely banking
and probably emails.

Serious distros such as Fedora, OpenSUSE, Debian etc. are far more
secure. These distros all have active security mailing lists which
provide timely security patches, offer Application whitelisting via
AppArmor and/or SELinux and of course, don't run everything as root
(honestly, wtf?).
If you value your security, don't use Puppy for anything serious.
On 2016-07-05 16:04, Eric Light wrote:
I'm guessing it's because PBTech deliver :-)

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5. Jul 2016 16:01 by will@artcontrol.me:

On Tuesday, July 5, 2016, Michelle <michelle400@orcon.net.nz>
wrote:

Well, I give up.

I have tried for months and invested dozens of hours to get a
machine that runs qubes and it hasn't happened.

So would somebody be willing to go into say pb tech with
different live puppy's on stick (or DVD) and finding what
computers run it.

Puppy was the distro I was wanting to run on my brand new
computer I bought last year. I have been told that it is hard to
find a new computer that won't rtun puppy. My new computer didn't.
Hopefully it is just a freak.

So if you are prepared to do that, could you then let me know at
least two of those computers that should be able to run qubes
according to the hardware specifications at the qubes website.

If nobody is prepared to do that it is more than fine. I will
just buy a computer that runs a windows legacy os.

Hi,

Why do you need to run puppy so much? If its a new computer best to
run a bigger distro. What's the computer? I'm guessing Intel 64bit
but correct me otherwise. You should be able to download Debian and
create a live usb, and install. Seems a waste to buy a new computer
when you already have a new computer. What's the computer running
currently? If its windows10 no point in switching to 7, best to
keep
win10 or switch to Linux.

If you can go to pbtech why can't you go to te ata on a Monday or
Friday and get Ian to help?

Cheers,

William

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